The Unthinkable

Humans are transforming Earth’s natural landscapes so dramatically that as many as one million plant and animal species are now at risk of extinction, posing a dire threat to ecosystems that people all over the world depend on for their survival, a sweeping new United Nations assessment has concluded.

The 1,500-page report, compiled by hundreds of international experts and based on thousands of scientific studies, is the most exhaustive look yet at the decline in biodiversity across the globe and the dangers that creates for human civilization. A summary of its findings, which was approved by representatives from the United States and 131 other countries, was released Monday in Paris. The full report is set to be published this year.

Contributing to the urgency, is Global Warming, and the resistance of the Trump Administration to accept its reality and causes.   As a result, policies in place to slow down and mitigate the impact of Global Warming, are being intentionally cut or ignored.https://youtu.be/B9K8jgUcZ00

The unthinkable has become our reality.   Short term economic advantage has trumped a responsibility for the well being of generations not yet born.

What are people of conscience to do?

First, it is important to support good science.  The overwhelming scientific community affirms that the  science is incontrovertible.   Global Warming is a reality and primarily caused by human actions.

Second, to collaborate with like minded organizations, local and global, that advocate for progressive governmental policies that limit carbon emissions and protect natural resources.  For example, on a local basis I’m a member of the Ipswich River Watershed Association, http://www.ipswichriver.org which protects the watershed I call home.  On a local and global level I support https://350.org founded by Bill McKibben to limit and ultimately begin to draw down the amount of carbon being emitted.

Third, vote for local and national politicians who will work to protect our environment.

Fourth, don’t give in to despair. Take the long view.  Advocating for the well being of our planet is a marathon, not a sprint.

Fifth, spend time in nature and with children.  Nature restores and inspires.  Spend time every week in the outdoors.  Savoring and soaking up the beauty and wonder of our natural world.  And, hang out with kids.  We are protecting the earth for the well being of children and generations of children to come.

Sixth, draw strength from a philosophical/spiritual foundation that fuels your passion.  John Muir, founder of the Sierra Club and a mystic at heart said:

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.”
John Muir

Seven, hold on to a righteous anger.  We must on behalf of creation, challenge and confront the selfish impulses of political and economic forces.   We are to offer positive, sustainable alternatives to the selfish ambitions of the few who seek to gain the most, in the short term.

Eight, draw wisdom from your spiritual tradition.  As a person who draws from the well of the Judeo-Christian tradition,  I believe that the willful destruction of the natural world is a deep and profound expression of Sin. I believe these words to be true: ‘If you love the Creator, then take care of creation.’  To turn our back on this truth, is to turn our back on the Creator.

God saw all that was made, and it was very good.  And there was evening, and there was morning, the sixth day.  ~ Genesis 1: 31

What is your conscience calling you to do?  May we choose wisely. For the sake of generations to come.

 

In Praise of Wild and Lonely Places

There is something evocative about slowing down and becoming quiet.  A primitive, even visceral desire, to strip away the distractions and focus on that which matters.

For many of us, getting outdoors, is a way of focusing on that which matters.  We do so by working in our garden, hiking, snowshoeing through the woods or walking on the beach.

We are drawn to that which allows our hearts, minds and imaginations to expand. To be reminded that we belong to the cosmos, not just to our daily routines.

Stephen Hiltner taps into this desire in a provocative article in the New York Times entitled: ‘In Britain, Enraptured by the Wild, Lonely and Remote’. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/21/travel/in-search-of-britains-bothies.html?partner=rss&emc=rss He writes of a journey through the wild lands of the United Kingdom, finding refuge and inspiration in isolated huts called ‘bothies’.

A vast majority of bothies are repurposed structures — crofters’ homes, shepherds’ huts, mining outbuildings — that have been salvaged from various states of disrepair by the Mountain Bothies Association, a charitable organization founded in 1965 whose aim is “to maintain simple shelters in remote country for the use and benefit of all who love wild and lonely places.” Some, like Warnscale Head in England’s Lake District, date to the 1700s. Collectively, since they came into recreational use in the 1930s as weekend getaways (sometimes used clandestinely) for working-class laborers, bothies have given rise to a unique culture that values communal respect for fellow visitors, for the bothies themselves and for the land on which they’re situated.

Such wild and lonely places remind me of a week spent on the Longtrail, in Vermont.  With my cousin, Tom, we spent that week moving from rustic hut to hut, soaking in the vistas and silence.

On the Longtrail, there is a tradition of receiving a ‘trail name’ that evokes who you are, or, what you hope to be.  My name was ‘Slow and Easy’.  The name reflects a tendency when on the trail, to linger and savor what the trail has to offer.  While some seek to conquer the trail by bagging a maximum of miles per day, my goal was to experience what was right in front of me.

Travelling ‘slow and easy’ was somewhat counterculture on the trail and certainly is countercultural in our plugged in, highly scheduled lives.

Back to the line I opened with: ‘There is something evocative about slowing down and becoming quiet’.

John Muir lived this truth. He was a mystic and founder of the Sierra Club in the 1930’s.  His formative years were nourished by the wild and lonely places in Scotland.  Later, as a youth, his family emigrated to the United States in the 1870’s and it was there that he fell in love with the wild and lonely places of America.

The moors of Scotland and the mountains of Yosemite, evoke a sense of awe, wonder and belonging to that which is greater than oneself.  Muir wrote:

“I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in.”

Muir’s words reflects that which drew monks and mystics for millenniums to the out-of-the-way places.  Yet, we know too, that such wild and exotic places are simply pointers to that place we can enter each day.  A reminder to slow down, reflect and reconnect, to that Source which is eternal, which is good, lasting and true.

The portal to such a place, begins by simply slowing down and becoming quiet.

Isaiah, an ancient prophet said: ‘Listen and your soul will live’.

May it be so.  Wherever your path may lead.

 

 

Donald Trump Meets The Paper Bag Princess

Twenty years ago I was a Dad with two young daughters. I knew I couldn’t protect them from all the foibles of society. What was within my control was to be the best Dad I could be. To offer them a healthy male role model. I knew that they were fortunate to have a wonderful role model in their mother. The wild card was me.

I had the power to do good or do harm. I knew my daughters were growing up in a society that too often objectifies girls, defining how they should look. I knew too that society can place limits on the dreams of girls and boys.

My hope for our two daughters was that they would grow up to be strong, confident, adventurous, curious and compassionate women. We’ve encouraged our girls to dream big, trust their instincts and have a heart for those on the margins.

Have I always been successful? No. Am I sometimes inconsistent? Yes. But I keep on trying to be the best dad I can be.

I’m grateful that we’ve raised our two remarkable daughters in a supportive church and community. It truly takes a village.

So it’s troubling on many levels to see that the presumptive Republican nominee for President is a misogynist. Donald Trump has called his fellow candidate, Carly Fiorina ‘ugly’ and dismissed Fox newscaster Megyn Kelly with crude language. The New York Times recently published an article entitled, ‘Crossing the Line: Trump’s Private Conduct With Women’. Based on dozens of interviews the article offers a consistent pattern of objectifying and belittling women who stand up to him.

I don’t want Mr. Trump in the White House. I don’t want him around my daughters. There is already to much sexism, we don’t need it coming from our nations highest office.

When our girls were little, I went to the library looking for a story where the girl was the hero. The librarian introduced me to a book entitled ‘The Paper Bag Princess’. The book tells the story of a girl waiting to be rescued by her prince. After waiting a very long time, the princess decides to rescue herself. Along the way she fights dragons and eventually meets her prince. The prince however is hapless and in need of being rescued from dragons. The princess rescues the prince. Instead of saying ‘thank you’, the rescued prince, critiques the princess for having a torn dress and disheveled hair. To her credit, the princess calls him a ‘jerk’ and tells him to ‘take a hike’.

Paper Bag Princess

I read this book many times. Our daughters grew up believing that they too were strong, smart and adventurous. The lives they are living testify to this.

This election is personal. Not only for the sake of my daughters but for all girls and boys. Children are looking to us adults to show them what it means to be a healthy woman and man. Mr. Trump, you’ve met your match in The Paper Bag Princess.